Floyd Mayweather, Professional Boxer   3 comments


Floyd Mayweather, Professional Boxer

Floyd Joy Mayweather, Jr. (born Floyd Sinclair; February 24, 1977) is an American professional boxer.[1] He is a five-division world champion, where he has won seven world titles, as well as the lineal championship in three different weight classes.[2] He is a two-time The Ring “Fighter of the Year” winning the award in 1998 and 2007,[3] and also won the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) “Fighter of the Year” award in 2007.[4] He is undefeated as a professional boxer.

Currently, Mayweather is the WBC welterweight champion.[5] He is also rated as the best pound for pound boxer in the world by most sporting news and boxing websites, including Sports Illustrated, ESPN, Fox Sports, Yahoo! Sports and About.com.

Early lifeMayweather was born in Grand Rapids, Mich., into a family of boxers. His father Floyd Mayweather Sr. was a former welterweight contender who fought Hall of Famer Sugar Ray Leonard and his uncles Jeff Mayweather and Roger Mayweather were all professional boxers, with Roger – Floyd’s current trainer – winning two world championships. Mayweather was born with his mother’s last name,[11] but his last name would change to Mayweather shortly thereafter. Mayweather’s father, Floyd Sr., had a side job – selling drugs[citation needed]. According to Mayweather Jr., his father was often a harsh disciplinarian[citation needed]. Mayweather says that when he was a baby, his father used him as a shield to keep his brother-in-law from shooting him. “It depends on which side of the family you talk to,” Mayweather Jr. says. “My father said he was holding me and he said, ‘If you’re going to shoot me, you’re going to shoot the baby, too.’ But my mother said he used me as a shield to keep from getting shot. “Either way, I’m just happy I didn’t get shot and I’m still here.”

Boxing has been a part of Mayweather’s life since his childhood. He never seriously considered any other profession. “I think my grandmother saw my potential first,” Mayweather said, smiling. “When I was young, I told her, ‘I think I should get a job.’ She said, ‘No, just keep boxing.’ “[12]”When I was about 8 or 9, I lived in New Jersey with my mother and we were seven deep in one bedroom and sometimes we didn’t have electricity”, Mayweather says. “When people see what I have now, they have no idea of where I came from and how I didn’t have anything growing up.”

It was not uncommon for young Floyd to come home from school and find used heroin needles in his front yard[citation needed]. His mother was also addicted to drugs and he had an aunt who died from AIDS because of her drug use. “People don’t know the hell I’ve been through,” he says.

The most time that his father spent with him was taking him to the gym to train and work on his boxing, according to Mayweather. “I don’t remember him ever taking me anywhere or doing anything that a father would do with a son, going to the park or to the movies or to get ice cream”, he says. “I always thought that he liked his daughter (Floyd’s older stepsister) better than he liked me because she never got whippings and I got whippings all the time.”

Floyd Sr. says Mayweather is not telling the truth about their early relationship. “Even though his daddy did sell drugs, I didn’t deprive my son,” Floyd Sr. says. “The drugs I sold he was a part of it. He had plenty of food. He had the best clothes and I gave him money. He didn’t want for anything. Anybody in Grand Rapids can tell you that I took care of my kids.”[13]

Floyd Sr. says he did all of his hustling at night and spent his days with his son, taking him to the gym and training him to be a boxer. “If it wasn’t for me he wouldn’t be where he is today,” Floyd Sr. says.

“I basically raised myself,” Mayweather says. “My grandmother did what she could. When she got mad at me I’d go to my mom’s house. My life was ups and downs.” Floyd Sr. says he knows how much pain his incarceration caused his son, but insists he did the best he could. “I sent him to live with his grandmother,” he says. “It wasn’t like I left him with strangers.”

Boxing became Mayweather’s outlet – a way to deal with the absence of his father[citation needed]. As his father served his time, Mayweather, with speed and an uncanny ring sense, put all his energies into boxing. He even dropped out of high school. “I knew that I was going to have to try to take care of my mom and I made the decision that school wasn’t that important at the time and I was going to have to box to earn a living,” Mayweather says.[13]

Amateur career and OlympicsMayweather had an amateur record of 84–6[14] and won national Golden Gloves championships in 1993 (at 106 lb), 1994 (at 114 lb), and 1996 (at 125 lb).[15] He was given the nickname “Pretty Boy” by his amateur teammates because he had relatively few scars, a result of the defensive techniques that his father (Floyd Mayweather, Sr.) and uncle (Roger Mayweather) had taught him.[16] In his orthodox defensive stance, Mayweather often utilizes the ‘shoulder roll’. The shoulder roll is an old-school boxing technique in which the right hand is held normally or slightly higher than normal, the left hand is down around the midsection, and the lead shoulder is raised high on the cheek in order to cover the chin and block punches. The right hand (from orthodox stance) is used as it normally would be to block punches coming from the other side, such as left hooks. From this stance, Mayweather blocks, slips, and deflects most of his opponents’ punches, even when cornered, by twisting left and right to the rhythm of their punches.[17]

At the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Mayweather won a bronze medal by reaching the semi-finals of the featherweight (57 kg)[18] division.

In the opening round, Mayweather led 10–1 on points over Bakhtiyar Tileganov of Kazakhstan before he won in Round 2 by referee stoppage. In the second round, Mayweather outpointed Artur Gevorgyan of Armenia 16–3. In the quarterfinals, the 19-year-old Mayweather, narrowly defeated the 22-year-old, Lorenzo Aragon of Cuba in an all-action bout to win 12–11, becoming the first U.S boxer to defeat a Cuban in 20 years.[19] The last time this had occurred was at 1976 Summer Olympics when the U.S Olympic boxing team captured five gold medals, among its recipients was boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard. In his semifinal bout against the eventual silver medalist, Serafim Todorov of Bulgaria, Mayweather lost by a controversial decision similarly to the Roy Jones Jr.’s decision.[20] Referee, Hamad Hafaz Shouman of Egypt, mistakenly raised Mayweather’s hand, thinking he had won, as the decision was announced giving the bout to the Bulgarian.[21]

The U.S team filed a protest over the Mayweather bout, claiming the judges were intimated by Bulgaria’s Emil Jetchev, head of the boxing officials, into favoring Bulgarian Serafim Todorov by a 10-9 decision in the 125-pound semifinal bout. Three of Jetchev’s countrymen were in gold medal bouts. Judge Bill Waeckerle, one of the four U.S judges working the games for the International Amateur Boxing Federation, quit both as an Olympic judge and as a federation judge after Mayweather lost a decision loudly booed by the crowd at the Alexander Memorial Coliseum.[22][23]

“I refuse to be part of an organisation that continues to conduct its officiating in this manner,” Waeckerle wrote in a letter of resignation to federation President Anwar Chowdhry.[24]

In the official protest, U.S team manager Gerald Smith said Mayweather landed punches that were not counted, while Todorov was given points without landing a punch.[25] “The judging was totally incompetent,” Waeckerle said. The judges failed to impose a mandatory two-point deduction against Todorov after he was warned five times by the referee for slapping.[21]

“Everybody knows Floyd Mayweather is the gold-medal favorite at 57 kilograms,” Mayweather said afterward. “In America, it’s known as 125 pounds. You know and I know I wasn’t getting hit. They say he’s the world champion. Now you all know who the real world champion is.”

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Posted February 25, 2012 by pennylibertygbow in Boxing Champs

3 responses to “Floyd Mayweather, Professional Boxer

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